EGYPT

7/5/13

Egypt’s interim president praised the mass protests demanding the ouster of Mohammed Morsi, saying they united Egyptians. “The most glorious thing about June 30 is that it brought together everyone without discrimination or division,” he said. “I offer my greetings to the revolutionary people of Egypt.” Adly Mansour was the Supreme constitutional court chief justice.
The Egyptian prosecutor’s office also ordered on Thursday the arrest of the Muslim Brotherhood’s top leader, Mohamed Badie, and his deputy Khairat el-Shater.
Both men were charged with inciting violence against protesters outside the Brotherhood’s headquarters in Cairo. Television stations sympathetic to Morsi were taken off air, and a newspaper affiliated with the Brotherhood’s political arm said the state-owned printing press had refused to produce its Thursday edition. “The Muslim Brotherhood are part of this people and are invited to participate in building the nation as nobody will be excluded, and if they respond to the invitation, they will be welcomed.”
Gulf Arab states have long seen Egypt as a strategic ally against any potential threat from non-Arab Iran across the Gulf.
Relations between Egypt and most Gulf Arab states suffered after the uprising that toppled long-time ally Mubarak and propelled the Muslim Brotherhood to power.
“Qatar will continue to respect the will of Egypt and its people across the spectrum,” Rached Ghannouchi, who heads Tunisia’s ruling Ennahda party close to the Muslim Brotherhood, ruled out a similar scenario in his country. The African Union is likely to suspend Egypt from all its activities, a senior source told Reuters news service in Addis Ababa.
The armed forces ousted Egypt’s first democratically elected president Wednesday after just a year in power, installing a temporary civilian government, suspending the constitution and calling for new elections. The 2011 uprising that ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Now it was one of multiple centers of a stunning four-day anti-Morsi revolt that brought out the biggest anti-government rallies Egypt has seen, topping even those of 2011. Morsi as saying the military’s measures “represent a full coup categorically rejected by all the free men of our nation.” Morsi has insisted his legitimacy as an elected president must not be violated or Egypt could be thrown in to violence. The army has insisted it is not carrying out a coup, but acting on the will of the people to clear the way for a new leadership. In his speech, army chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said the chief justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court would step in as interim president until new elections are held. He would be sworn in judges of his court, el-Sissi said. A government of technocrats would be formed with “full powers” to run the country. El-Sissi promised “not to exclude anyone or any movement” from further steps. But he did not define the length of the transition period or when presidential elections would be held. He also did not mention any role for the military. The constitution, drafted by Morsi’s Islamist allies, was “temporarily suspended, “he warned that the armed forces, police will deal “decisively” with violence. Travel bans were imposed on Morsi and top figures from his Muslim Brotherhood including its chief Mohammed Badie and his powerful deputy Khairat el-Shater.
The army’s move is the second time in Egypt’s 2 ½ years of turmoil that it has forced out the country’s leader. Those who took to the streets this week say he lost his electoral legitimacy because he tried to give the Brotherhood and Islamist allies a monopoly on power, pushed through a constitution largely written by his allies and mismanaged the country’s multiple crises. Morsi and his allies say the opposition never accepted their appeals for dialogue — seen by opponents as empty gestures — and that Mubarak loyalists throughout the government sabotaged their attempts to bring change.
Earlier in the day, el-Sissi met with ElBaradei, Egypt’s top Muslim cleric — Al-Azhar Sheik Ahmed el-Tayeb — and Coptic Pope Tawadros II, as well as youth representatives and some members of the ultraconservative Salafi movements. The consultations apparently aimed to bring as wide a consensus as possible behind the army’s moves. But the Brotherhood boycotted the session.
Obama stopped short of calling the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi a coup d’etat. In a carefully worded statement, Obama said he was “deeply concerned” by the military’s move to topple Morsi’s government and suspend Egypt’s constitution. He said he was ordering the U.S. government to assess what the military’s actions meant for U.S. foreign aid to Egypt. Under U.S. law, the government must suspend foreign aid to any nation whose elected leader is ousted in a coup d’etat. The U.S. provides $1.5 billion a year to Egypt in military and economic assistance that is considered a critical U.S. national security priority.
Obama said. The U.S. wasn’t taking sides in the conflict, committing itself only to democracy and respect for the rule of law, Obama said. Egyptian armed forces on Wednesday ousted Morsi, an Islamist and Egypt’s first democratically elected president, after just a year in power. The military installed a temporary civilian government, suspended the constitution and called for new elections.
As I have said since the Egyptian Revolution, the United States supports a set of core principles, including opposition to violence, protection of universal human rights, and reform that meets the legitimate aspirations of the people. The United States does not support particular individuals or political parties, but we are committed to the democratic process and respect for the rule of law. Since the current unrest in Egypt began, we have called on all parties to work together to address the legitimate grievances of the Egyptian people, in accordance with the democratic process, and without recourse to violence or the use of force.
I now call on the Egyptian military to move quickly and responsibly to return full authority back to a democratically elected civilian government as soon as possible through an inclusive and transparent process, and to avoid any arbitrary arrests of President Morsy and his supporters. The goal of any political process should be a government that respects the rights of all people, majority and minority; that institutionalizes the checks and balances upon which democracy depends; and that places the interests of the people above party or faction. An honest, capable and representative government is what ordinary Egyptians seek and what they deserve.
With Egypt in Full Coup Mode, Guess Where the U.S. Secretary of State Reportedly Spent Time Wednesday?
Kerry was on a boat.!
Sources—newsmax, ap, hamza hendawi, Maggie Michael, sarah el deeb, the blaze, Jason howerton

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